About Rachel Timor

Biographical Notes

1954
Born in Tel Aviv to Rivka and Jossef Motro, the seventh generation in a family of citrus growers.
1968
Advanced painting studies with Meir Mozes.
1974
Studied sculpture at the Avni Institute, Tel Aviv.

Solo Exhibitions

1975
Ribenfeld Gallery, Jaffa Artist Association, Tel Aviv
1977
Lambert Monet Gallery, Cologne, The Orient Hotel, Bangkok
1978
Wagner Gallery, Sydney
1980
Gallery 76, Munich
1981
Habima Theatre, Tel Aviv
1984
“Tel Aviv of Yesterday”, The Museum of the History of Tel Aviv-Jaffa
1985
Jerusalem Theatre Gallery
1990
“family Stories”, Rubin Museum, Tel Aviv
1992
“on a Thin Rope”, Amalia Arbel Gallery, Tel Aviv
1993
Galerie Prazan-Fitoussi, Paris
1994
International Style Architecture Conference, Loft Gallery, Jaffa
1997 
Hong Kong Art Center Performing Arts Center, Tel Aviv
1998
Kunstsalon, Sommerpalais, Harrach, Vienna
2006
The museum of Israeli art, Ramat Gan
2007
Street statue, Bat-Yam
2008
Street statue, Lod
2009
“Ha Tachana” Tel-Aviv
2016
Bruno gallery Singapore

Book Illustrations

“Family Stories” (twenty-seven paintings of the founding families of the Jewish settlement in Eretz Israel)

Group Exhibitions

1973
Yad Labanim Museum, Rehovot / Yad Labanim Museum, Givatayim
1976
Basel Art Fair / Dusseldorf Art Fair / Gallery Schwartzer, Vienna
1979
131/2 Gallery, Jaffa
1980
Basel Art Fair / Dusseldorf Art Fair
1981
Yad Labanim Museum, Tel Aviv / Yad Labanim Museum, Holon / Haramati Gallery, Tel Aviv
1982
Art Expo, New York
1984
131/2 Gallery, Jaffa
1990
Karni Gallery International, Toronto
1991
Artist’s Association Gallery, Tel Aviv
1993
Korea Art Fair, Seoul
1994
“Interplay of Material, Technique, and Style in Medal Art”, Fiden Holland
1996
Shelters Exhibition, Tel Aviv
1997
Marvin Center Gallery, George Washington University, Washington D.C.
1999
Tel Aviv Museum of Art “Green Not Cement”, Beit Bialik Museum
2002
Europe’s Art, Paris
2004
Royal Academy of art- Summer Exhibition
2015
Public Collection, Vatican – Rome

Public Collections

The Israel Government Coins and Medals Corporation
The Knesset, Jerusalem
President’s Residence, Jerusalem
City Hall, Tel Aviv
Collections of Bank Leumi,
IsraelDiscount Bank
Bank Hapoalim
Private collections in Israel and abroad

Rachel Timor

Rachel Timor – Photo by Tamar Matsafi

Painter Rachel Timor regards her work as a type of instructive documentation, contemplation of our past and its assimilation into the hearts of contemporary viewers, arising from an imperative to entwine the past and future that have become an integral part of our present being. The artist is an active participant in history, a fact reflacted in her paintings. She reviews the past, employing it as a model for the generation living in the present. Her painting is engulfed in historical documentation, humorous in part.

The act of painting is a conscious process of influence inseparable from her childhood home, a work of art created out of nothing, a painting wrapped in a personal vein, in an attempt to convey the general atmosphere of the period. One can encounter entire stories through these paintings that are imbued with a pristine feel.

Timor recently relinquished the colorfulness that had accompanied her throughout the years, and has shifted to “photographing” the good old Tel Aviv with her unique lines. She paints after the camera, her lines guiding the eye to follow the forms and structures, until they are defined as the objects, streets and figures of her “local” Tel Aviv. Timor seems to identify with Man Ray’s proclamation: “ I photograph what I cannot paint and I paint what I cannot photograph.” On the one hand, she engages in documentation that traces a reality long gone, on the other- the use of black and white distances the painting from its resemblance to life.

One may perceive this as swift painting of man and landscape.

Despite the repetition of the same line, however, Timor manages to maintain a type of freshness.

In her ‘oeuvre’, the nature of meaning is elemental and easily intelligible, thus it may be termed ‘factual meaning’. Its deciphering is made possible through identification of places and a way of life familiar to us from the past, while facing the gap between the past and the future.